Anthropology

Anthropology

Anthropologists and archeologists study the origin, development, and behavior of humans. They examine the cultures, languages, archeological remains, and physical characteristicsof people in various parts of the world.

Anthropologists and archeologists typically do the following:

  • Plan cultural research
  • Customize data collection methods according to a particular region, specialty, or project
  • Collect information from observations, interviews, and documents
  • Record and manage records of observations taken in the field
  • Analyze data, laboratory samples, and other sources of information to uncover patterns about human life, culture, and origins
  • Prepare reports and present research findings
  • Advise organizations on the cultural impact of policies, programs, and products

By drawing and building on knowledge from the humanities and the social, physical, and biological sciences, anthropologists and archeologists examine the ways of life, languages, archeological remains, and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. They also examine the customs, values, and social patterns of different cultures.

Archeologists examine, recover, and preserve evidence of human activity from past cultures. They analyze human remains and artifacts, such as tools, pottery, cave paintings, and ruins of buildings. They connect their findings with information about past environments to learn about the history, customs, and living habits of people in earlier eras.

Archeologists also manage and protect archeological sites. Some work in national parks or at historical sites, providing site protection and educating the public. Others assess building sites to ensure that construction plans comply with federal regulations related to site preservation. Archeologists often specialize in a particular geographic area, period, or object of study, such as animal remains or underwater sites.

Anthropology is divided into three primary fields: biological or physical anthropology, cultural or social anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Biological and physical anthropologists study the changing nature of the biology of humans and closely related primates. Cultural anthropologists study the social and cultural consequences of various human-related issues, such as overpopulation, natural disasters, warfare, and poverty. Linguistic anthropology studies the history and development of languages.

A growing number of anthropologists perform market research for businesses, studying the demand for products by a particular culture or social group. Using their anthropological background and a variety of techniques—including interviews, surveys, and observations—they may collect data on how a product is used by specific demographic groups.

Many people with a Ph.D. in anthropology or archeology become professors or museum curators.

Program Code

8109 Associate in Arts (AA), Anthropology

The minimum time to complete the Associate of Art degree is four full-time (15-16 credit hours) semesters for students who have no pre-existing college credit. Anthropology courses are offered through face-to-face instruction, online and hybrid formats.

Currently, the tuition for an Associate of Art degree for Anthropology students is $5,288. Many anthropology courses use Open Educational Resources for class readings so there are LOW or NO TEXTBOOK COSTS in the courses.

Program Curriculum

  • Mapping in Process

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Program Contacts

Dr. Lisa Marsio, Department Chair and Program Advisor
Office: SBE-118
(480) 425-6794
lisa.marsio@scottsdalecc.edu

Transfer Options

Arizona State University

Northern Arizona University

University of Arizona

While students may also choose to transfer to out-of-state programs, we do not have transfer partnerships with those programs. Connect with your transfer destination to determine which courses can be taken at SCC.

Career Outlook

The demand in the job market for people with an anthropology background is stimulated by a growing need for researchers and analysts with keen thinking skills who can manage, evaluate and interpret large amounts of data. As the many spheres of human interaction expand globally, people trained in anthropology will increasingly be sought for their broad, holistic knowledge and perspective, which are the hallmarks of anthropology. Some career opportunities include:

  • acting as legal advocates in international cases
  • analyzing and proposing policies
  • conducting postgraduate academic research
  • consulting for large and small private and public organizations
  • curating cultural resources
  • directing nonprofit organizations
  • directing programs in the private or public sector
  • managing cultural resources in public and private sectors
  • modeling infectious diseases
  • planning communities
  • providing health care as nurses, doctors or public or global health professionals
  • teaching

Career examples include but are not limited to those shown in the following list. Advanced degrees or certifications may be required for some positions.

Career Growth Median Salary
Anthropologist/Archaeologist 4.5% $62,280
College/University Professor (Anthropology/Archaeology) 10.0% $81,580
Archivist 14.3% $51,760
Museum Curator 14.0% $53,770
Regulatory Affairs Manager/Investment Fund Manager 8.0% $105,610
Sociologist 1.3% $79,650
Sociology Professor 9.8% $73,080

*Data obtained from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET) under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Labor/Employment and Training Administration (USDOL/ETA).