Anthropology - AA

The Associate in Arts (AA), Anthropology degree provides the first two years of a four-year curriculum for students who wish to specialize in anthropology. With a bachelor`s degree, students may pursue a career as a social science research assistant. With a graduate degree, students may pursue employment opportunities in several careers, including anthropologists, archeologists, anthropology and archeology professors, ethnic and cultural studies professors, and curators.

Details

Major Code: 
8109
Award: 
Associate in Arts, Anthropology
Total credits required: 
60-64
Award notes

Students must earn a grade of C or better in each course in the program.

Program Learning Outcomes
  • Develop an understanding of anthropology and how the subfields interrelate. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, ASB230, ASM104, ASM/FOR275, GPH210)
  • Demonstrate knowledge and comprehension of cultures, past and present, including ecological relationships, subsistence, social organization, and belief systems. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223)
  • Apply a holistic anthropological and culturally relativistic approach to understanding cultural similarities and differences and applying anthropology to local, national, and global human issues. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, [FYC], [G], [H], [SB])
  • Develop and apply critical thinking and observation skills through the analysis of real world anthropological case studies using the scientific method and multiple perspectives. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, ASB230, ASB245, ASM104, ASM/FOR275, MAT206, PSY230, SWU225, [FYC], [MA], (COM))
  • Demonstrate the ability to obtain, critically read, analyze, summarize and critique anthropological research through use of appropriate source material. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, ASB230, ASB245, ASM104, ASM/FOR275, MAT206, PSY230, SWU225, [FYC], [MA], [L], (COM), (CRE))
  • Utilize the scientific method to investigate the foundations of human biological variation through a critical evaluation of both ancient and recent human biological adaptation and evolution. (ASB245, ASM104, ASM/FOR275, [MA], [SQ], [SG])
  • Evaluate, through archaeological research, the processes of human cultural evolution, such as the origins of: language, agriculture, settled village and urban life, writing, religion, social inequalities and state formation. (ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, GPH211)
  • Apply anthropological ethical principles through the critical analysis of real world case studies. (ASB100, ASB102, ASB222, ASB223, ASB230, ASM104, ASM/FOR275)

At Scottsdale...

For additional information about this program, visit: 

College Tabs

Description

Anthropologists and archeologists study the origin, development, and behavior of humans. They examine the cultures, languages, archeological remains, and physical characteristicsof people in various parts of the world.

Anthropologists and archeologists typically do the following:

  • Plan cultural research
  • Customize data collection methods according to a particular region, specialty, or project
  • Collect information from observations, interviews, and documents
  • Record and manage records of observations taken in the field
  • Analyze data, laboratory samples, and other sources of information to uncover patterns about human life, culture, and origins
  • Prepare reports and present research findings
  • Advise organizations on the cultural impact of policies, programs, and products

By drawing and building on knowledge from the humanities and the social, physical, and biological sciences, anthropologists and archeologists examine the ways of life, languages, archeological remains, and physical characteristics of people in various parts of the world. They also examine the customs, values, and social patterns of different cultures.

Archeologists examine, recover, and preserve evidence of human activity from past cultures. They analyze human remains and artifacts, such as tools, pottery, cave paintings, and ruins of buildings. They connect their findings with information about past environments to learn about the history, customs, and living habits of people in earlier eras.

Archeologists also manage and protect archeological sites. Some work in national parks or at historical sites, providing site protection and educating the public. Others assess building sites to ensure that construction plans comply with federal regulations related to site preservation. Archeologists often specialize in a particular geographic area, period, or object of study, such as animal remains or underwater sites.

Anthropology is divided into three primary fields: biological or physical anthropology, cultural or social anthropology, and linguistic anthropology. Biological and physical anthropologists study the changing nature of the biology of humans and closely related primates. Cultural anthropologists study the social and cultural consequences of various human-related issues, such as overpopulation, natural disasters, warfare, and poverty. Linguistic anthropology studies the history and development of languages.

A growing number of anthropologists perform market research for businesses, studying the demand for products by a particular culture or social group. Using their anthropological background and a variety of techniques—including interviews, surveys, and observations—they may collect data on how a product is used by specific demographic groups.

Many people with a Ph.D. in anthropology or archeology become professors or museum curators.

Program Length

The minimum time to complete the Associate of Art degree is four full-time (15-16 credit hours) semesters for students who have no pre-existing college credit. Anthropology courses are offered through face-to-face instruction, online and hybrid formats.

Cost

Currently, the tuition for an Associate of Art degree for Anthropology students is $5,288. Many anthropology courses use Open Educational Resources for class readings so there are LOW or NO TEXTBOOK COSTS in the courses.

Program Contacts

Dr. Lisa Marsio, Department Chair and Program Advisor
Office: SBE-118
(480) 425-6794
lisa.marsio@scottsdalecc.edu

Required courses
Course #Course TitleCredits
Credits:13
ASB102Introduction to Cultural Anthropology3
ASM104Bones, Stones, and Human Evolution4
ASB222Buried Cities and Lost Tribes: Old World (3) OR
ASB223Buried Cities and Lost Tribes: New World (3)3
MAT206Elements of Statistics (3) OR
PSY230Introduction to Statistics (3) OR
SWU225Statistics for Social Research/Justice and Government (3)3
(MAT206OR SWU225 required for ASU BA, MAT206 OR PSY230 required for NAU and U of A)
Restricted Electives
Course #Course TitleCredits
Credits:0-23
Complete all courses in the transfer option that best aligns with your academic and professional goals. If your intended transfer institution is not listed, then select a combination of courses from the transfer options listed in order to meet the minimum credits required in the Restricted Electives section. Consult with an academic, faculty, or program advisor to prevent exceeding your university transfer program`s maximum transferable credits (typically 64).
Subplan 1: Arizona State University: Anthropology, Bachelor of Arts
Foreign Language Credits:0-20
Completion of a language course at the intermediate level (202 or equivalent), including American Sign Language with a C or better OR demonstrating proficiency through this level as indicated by assessment.
ARB+++ any ARB/Arabic course
CHI+++ any CHI/Chinese course
FRE+++ any FRE/French course
GER+++ any GER/German course
ITA+++ any ITA/Italian course
JPN+++ any JPN/Japanese course
SPA+++ any SPA/Spanish course
SLG+++ any SLG/Sign Language course
Subplan 2: Arizona State University: Anthropology, Bachelor of Science
Students must complete 6-8 credits of coursework that transfers to ASU as an ASB or ASM direct equivalent or as an ASB or ASM departmental elective.
ASB+++ any Anthropology course
ASM+++ any Anthropology course
Subplan 3: Northern Arizona University: Anthropology, Bachelor of Arts
ASB230Principles of Archaeology, Recommended for Archaeology Emphasis (3) OR
ASB245Indians of the Southwest, Recommended for Sociocultural Anthropology Emphasis (3)3
Foreign Language Credits:0-20
Completion of a language course at the intermediate level (202 or equivalent), including American Sign Language IV with a C or better OR demonstrating proficiency through this level as indicated by assessment.
ARB+++ any ARB/Arabic course
CHI+++ any CHI/Chinese course
FRE+++ any FRE/French course
GER+++ any GER/German course
ITA+++ any ITA/Italian course
JPN+++ any JPN/Japanese course
SPA+++ any SPA/Spanish course
SLG+++ any SLG/Sign Language course
Subplan 4: University of Arizona: Anthropology, Bachelor of Arts
ASB230Principles of Archaeology3
Foreign Language Credits:0-20
Complete a language course at the intermediate level (202 or equivalent), including American Sign Language IV with a C or better OR demonstrate proficiency through this level as indicated by assessment.
ARB+++ any ARB/Arabic course
CHI+++ any CHI/Chinese course
FRE+++ any FRE/French course
GER+++ any GER/German course
ITA+++ any ITA/Italian course
JPN+++ any JPN/Japanese course
SPA+++ any SPA/Spanish course
SLG+++ any SLG/Sign Language course
Subplan 5: University of Arizona: Anthropology, Bachelor of Science
ASB230Principles of Archaeology3
Foreign Language Credits:0-10
Complete a language course at the elementary level (102 or equivalent), including American Sign Language II with a C or better OR demonstrate proficiency through this level as indicated by assessment.
ARB+++ any ARB/Arabic course
CHI+++ any CHI/Chinese course
FRE+++ any FRE/French course
GER+++ any GER/German course
ITA+++ any ITA/Italian course
JPN+++ any JPN/Japanese course
SPA+++ any SPA/Spanish course
SLG+++ any SLG/Sign Language course
Arizona General Education Curriculum (AGEC)
AGEC-ACredits: 22-33
A single course with an [HU], [SB], or [L] designation(s) may also be used to satisfy the Oral Communication, Critical Reading, or Awareness Area ([C], [G] and/or [H]) requirement(s).
 
First-Year Composition [FYC]Credits: 6
ENG101First-Year Composition (3) OR
ENG107First-Year Composition for ESL (3) AND
ENG102First-Year Composition (3) OR
ENG108First-Year Composition for ESL (3)6
 
Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L]Credits: 3
Any approved general education course in the Literacy and Critical Inquiry [L] area.
 
Mathematics [MA]Credits: 3-5
MAT140College Mathematics (5) OR
MAT141College Mathematics (4) OR
MAT142College Mathematics (3) OR
MAT220Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (5) OR
MAT221Calculus with Analytic Geometry I (4)3-5
(MAT140,or MAT141, or MAT142 required for ASU BA, NAU BA, and U of A BA)
(MAT220or MAT221 required for ASU BS and U of A BS)
 
Computer/Statistics/Quantitative Applications [CS]Credits: 0
Met by MAT206, PSY230, or SWU225 in Required Courses.
 
Humanities, Arts and Design [HU]Credits: 3
Met by ASB222 OR ASB223 in Required Courses, AND
Any approved general education course in the Humanities, Arts, and Design [HU] area. A course with an ASB prefix is recommended.3
 
Social-Behavioral Sciences [SB]Credits: 3
Met by ASB102 in Required Courses AND
Any approved general education course in the Social-Behavioral Sciences [SB] area3
 
Natural Sciences [SG]/[SQ]Credits: 4
Met by ASM104 in Required Courses AND
Any approved general education course in the Natural Sciences [SQ] quantitative area.4
 
Awareness AreasCredits: 0-3
These requirements may be shared with Core Requirements.
 
Cultural Diversity in the US [C]Credits: 0-3
0-3
 
Historical/Global Awareness [H]/[G]Credits: 0
Met by ASB102 in Required Courses.
 
MCCCD Additional Requirements
MCCCD Additional RequirementsCredits: 0-6
Courses in this area may also be applied to the AGEC Core Requirements. To minimize total credits required for degree and maximize transferable credits, it is recommended that courses be selected that meet more than one requirement wherever possible.
 
Oral CommunicationCredits: 0-3
COM100Introduction to Human Communication (3) OR
COM110Interpersonal Communication (3) OR
COM225Public Speaking (3) OR
COM230Small Group Communication (3)0-3
 
Critical ReadingCredits: 0-3
CRE101College Critical Reading and Critical Thinking (3) OR
Equivalent as indicated by assessment (0)0-3
General Electives
Course #Course TitleCredits
Select courses 100-level or higher to complete a minimum of 60 semester credits but no more than a total of 64 semester credits. Consult with an Academic Advisor.

At Maricopa, we strive to provide you with accurate information about this degree or certificate. However, the information above represents current requirements for the academic year and may change as the result of the curricular process. This course list does not represent a contract, nor does it guarantee course availability. If you are interested in pursuing this degree or certificate, we encourage you to meet with an advisor to discuss the requirements at your college for the appropriate catalog year.